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A Guy Driving a Tesla Saved a Stroke Victim Stuck in a Runaway Volkswagen

by added on 16 February 2017, Comments Off on A Guy Driving a Tesla Saved a Stroke Victim Stuck in a Runaway Volkswagen , posted in Grid Edge, Electric Vehicles, News,

Teslarati: Musk Thanks Tesla Driver for Sacrificing Model S in Order to Save Stroke Victim's Life

The 41-year-old German man who deliberately placed his Tesla Model S in front of a runaway Volkswagen Passat, after finding the driver unconscious as a result of a stroke, is being heralded as a hero. Not just by the 57-year-old life that he saved, but by Tesla CEO Elon Musk himself.

Musk took to Twitter to congratulate Manfred Kick for sacrificing his car to bring the out of control VW safely to a stop. In appreciation for the heroic act, Musk said Tesla will be expediting repairs and will cover all costs associated with fixing the damages.

Electrek: Norway Is Reaching Tipping Point for Electric Vehicles as Market Share Reaches 37%

We reported back in December how Norway reached the rare milestone of 100,000 all-electric vehicles on the roads despite its relatively small population.

In September 2016, 28.8% of new car sales were plug-in electric vehicles and all-electric cars had 19.0% market share. It’s 10 times what most countries are doing these days thanks to EV incentives like the 25% VAT tax exemption.

Norway pushed the limits last month with record plug-in electric sales reaching 37% market share in the country’s passenger car market. Over 4,800 plug-in electric vehicles were delivered in the country in January – helped by strong BMW i3 sales (622 units) and some PHEV vehicles like the Volvo XC90 (398 units) and the Volkswagen Passat GTE (411 units).

Oil Price: A Bloodbath Looms Over Oil Markets

Oil prices have traded reliably in the $50s per barrel since OPEC agreed to cut production last November, but having failed to break through a ceiling in the upper-$50s, crude prices are in danger of falling back again.

The oil market had wind in its sails on expectations of substantial drawdowns in inventories following the pending cut of a combined 1.8 million barrels per day (1.2 mb/d from OPEC plus nearly 0.6 mb/d from non-OPEC countries). Indeed, the IEA reports that oil inventories in OECD countries have declined for five consecutive months, although they still stand above the running five-year average. Meanwhile, in the U.S. oil inventories have actually increased significantly so far in 2017.

Guardian: Solar-Powered Trains Are Closer to Reality Than We Might Think

Electric trains are by far the best long distance transport mode when it comes to carbon emissions -- at least when their electricity comes from renewable sources like solar or wind.

But the UK’s ageing power network poses a significant challenges to any bid to decarbonize road and rail that relies on the grid. There are now swathes of the British countryside where it is impossible to plug in any new solar, wind or hydropower without being hit with a whopping bill for the full costs of local network reinforcement.

Faced with this constraint, and squeezed by government subsidy cuts, UK solar developers have started to focus on ways to generate power directly for consumption, rather than exporting it to the grid. With the right customers, solar developers can offer lower tariffs than the grid, while still earning more for their power than they would get from exporting it.

AutoBlog: Americans Drove More Last Year, but Still Below Peak

The typical American household boosted its driving miles last year, but still doesn't drive as much as it did during the collective driving peak a decade ago, according to a report authored by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute's Michael Sivak. Average driving distance per US household, which peaked in 2004 at 22,439, fell steadily until 2013, at which point it rebounded slightly. Last year's average household driving rose 1.4 percent to 22,311 miles.

The first year US driving habits are available is 1984. Average driving distances per year rose steadily in the 1980s and 1990s, hit its plateau just before the Great Recession, and is rebounding slightly from early-decade lows.

What’s Best for Vehicle-to-Grid: Buses or Cars?

by added on 10 July 2018, Comments Off on What’s Best for Vehicle-to-Grid: Buses or Cars? , posted in Grid Edge, Electric Vehicles, News,

With electric vehicle sales around the world picking up, many companies are looking to vehicle-to-grid applications.

So far, however, V2G has largely been stuck in pilot mode – and it could be a long time before electric cars become two-way distributed power plants. 

Efforts to test and deploy V2G have also focused largely on cars. But are buses a better way to scale? Buses are, after all, publicly owned and come with big batteries and predictable schedules. 

To find out which type of vehicle really is best for V2G, GTM Research contributing analyst Timotej Gavrilovic reviewed the pros and cons of each.

The results are not clear cut. Buses do, indeed, score highly for V2G because of their larger batteries. That means more energy storage capacity with fewer vehicles, Gavrilovic said, and more market participation opportunities.

Furthermore, the predictable routes and driving patterns of bus fleets make it easier to schedule V2G participation time.

Finally, said Gavrilovic, the charging equipment for electric buses is typically more bulky and costly than that needed for private cars, so adding V2G capabilities increases the cost by a proportionately lower amount. 

On the minus side, though, any public authority investing in a bus fleet will naturally want to maximize its return on investment, which means keeping the vehicles on the road as much as possible. Hence the actual amount of time that buses can devote to V2G might be limited. 

The most obvious way around this would be to buy more buses, which is costly and misses the point of having a V2G program to make use of bus batteries when they are idle. 

Furthermore, there is little practical experience of bus-based V2G schemes, said Gavrilovic. And “long sales cycles can be expected due to the nature of the public service industry,” he noted. 

In contrast, the longer history of V2G pilots involving cars means there is more infrastructure and other groundwork in place for it to work. For example, there is a V2G vehicle charger certification scheme, CHAdeMO, with a list of certified chargers that has doubled in recent months, Gavrilovic said. 

Companies have been working on auto-based V2G equipment and software for decades, he said, and the concept has been piloted across the U.S. and Europe. And car-based V2G has the support of major automakers. 

Nissan, among others, is active in the space. In May, it launched a “groundbreaking vehicle-to-grid project in the U.K.” alongside Enel, the Italian utility giant.

“The trial will work by installing and connecting 100 V2G units at locations agreed by private and fleet owners of the Nissan LEAF and e-NV200 electric van,” said the carmaker. “By giving Nissan electric vehicle owners the ability to plug their vehicles into the V2G system, owners will have the flexibility and power to sell stored energy from their vehicle battery back to the National Grid.” 

But the relatively small size of family vehicle batteries remains a handicap for V2G schemes based on cars, said Gavrilovic.

“Many vehicles need to participate in V2G programs to reach minimum capacity requirements in wholesale markets,” he said. 

This means demand-side management providers may need to add other distributed energy resources to their V2G schemes, for example by encouraging non-V2G vehicle owners to charge at certain times of day. Furthermore, car-based V2G very much depends on residential customer engagement, which could be hard to achieve without significant marketing and promotion. 

As a result, said Gavrilovic: “I don't have a clear answer as to which use case is better. Ultimately, I don't think there will be too much of a difference and both vehicle types will be providing V2G services.”

The market for both types of V2G, but particularly for buses, is still early-stage, he said, “so it's still very difficult to predict how and where it will grow.”

A Guy Driving a Tesla Saved a Stroke Victim Stuck in a Runaway Volkswagen

by added on 16 February 2017, Comments Off on A Guy Driving a Tesla Saved a Stroke Victim Stuck in a Runaway Volkswagen , posted in Grid Edge, Electric Vehicles, News,

Teslarati: Musk Thanks Tesla Driver for Sacrificing Model S in Order to Save Stroke Victim's Life

The 41-year-old German man who deliberately placed his Tesla Model S in front of a runaway Volkswagen Passat, after finding the driver unconscious as a result of a stroke, is being heralded as a hero. Not just by the 57-year-old life that he saved, but by Tesla CEO Elon Musk himself.

Musk took to Twitter to congratulate Manfred Kick for sacrificing his car to bring the out of control VW safely to a stop. In appreciation for the heroic act, Musk said Tesla will be expediting repairs and will cover all costs associated with fixing the damages.

Electrek: Norway Is Reaching Tipping Point for Electric Vehicles as Market Share Reaches 37%

We reported back in December how Norway reached the rare milestone of 100,000 all-electric vehicles on the roads despite its relatively small population.

In September 2016, 28.8% of new car sales were plug-in electric vehicles and all-electric cars had 19.0% market share. It’s 10 times what most countries are doing these days thanks to EV incentives like the 25% VAT tax exemption.

Norway pushed the limits last month with record plug-in electric sales reaching 37% market share in the country’s passenger car market. Over 4,800 plug-in electric vehicles were delivered in the country in January – helped by strong BMW i3 sales (622 units) and some PHEV vehicles like the Volvo XC90 (398 units) and the Volkswagen Passat GTE (411 units).

Oil Price: A Bloodbath Looms Over Oil Markets

Oil prices have traded reliably in the $50s per barrel since OPEC agreed to cut production last November, but having failed to break through a ceiling in the upper-$50s, crude prices are in danger of falling back again.

The oil market had wind in its sails on expectations of substantial drawdowns in inventories following the pending cut of a combined 1.8 million barrels per day (1.2 mb/d from OPEC plus nearly 0.6 mb/d from non-OPEC countries). Indeed, the IEA reports that oil inventories in OECD countries have declined for five consecutive months, although they still stand above the running five-year average. Meanwhile, in the U.S. oil inventories have actually increased significantly so far in 2017.

Guardian: Solar-Powered Trains Are Closer to Reality Than We Might Think

Electric trains are by far the best long distance transport mode when it comes to carbon emissions -- at least when their electricity comes from renewable sources like solar or wind.

But the UK’s ageing power network poses a significant challenges to any bid to decarbonize road and rail that relies on the grid. There are now swathes of the British countryside where it is impossible to plug in any new solar, wind or hydropower without being hit with a whopping bill for the full costs of local network reinforcement.

Faced with this constraint, and squeezed by government subsidy cuts, UK solar developers have started to focus on ways to generate power directly for consumption, rather than exporting it to the grid. With the right customers, solar developers can offer lower tariffs than the grid, while still earning more for their power than they would get from exporting it.

AutoBlog: Americans Drove More Last Year, but Still Below Peak

The typical American household boosted its driving miles last year, but still doesn't drive as much as it did during the collective driving peak a decade ago, according to a report authored by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute's Michael Sivak. Average driving distance per US household, which peaked in 2004 at 22,439, fell steadily until 2013, at which point it rebounded slightly. Last year's average household driving rose 1.4 percent to 22,311 miles.

The first year US driving habits are available is 1984. Average driving distances per year rose steadily in the 1980s and 1990s, hit its plateau just before the Great Recession, and is rebounding slightly from early-decade lows.

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